Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home/content/57/10818357/html/index.php:2) in /home/content/57/10818357/html/wp-includes/feed-rss2.php on line 8
For Scholars – Truman Scholars Association https://trumanscholars.org Fri, 11 Feb 2011 23:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://trumanscholars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/truman_logo_gsuite-100x100.gif For Scholars – Truman Scholars Association https://trumanscholars.org 32 32 Lifting the Curtain on the Truman Finalist Selection Process https://trumanscholars.org/for-scholars/lifting-the-curtain-on-the-truman-finalist-selection-process/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lifting-the-curtain-on-the-truman-finalist-selection-process Fri, 11 Feb 2011 23:00:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/02/11/lifting-the-curtain-on-the-truman-finalist-selection-process Posted in For Scholars

Many Truman Scholars, nominees, and friends of Scholars may wonder what exactly happens during the Truman Scholarship Finalist Selection Process. This year, Doug Cutchins, Director of Social Commitment at Grinnell University, is writing a short-term blog about his experience participating on the Finalist Selection Committee (FSC). Below is an excerpt from Reading Harry:  My goal […]

The post Lifting the Curtain on the Truman Finalist Selection Process appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Many Truman Scholars, nominees, and friends of Scholars may wonder what exactly happens during the Truman Scholarship Finalist Selection Process. This year, Doug Cutchins, Director of Social Commitment at Grinnell University, is writing a short-term blog about his experience participating on the Finalist Selection Committee (FSC).

Below is an excerpt from Reading Harry

My goal with this blog is twofold: 1) to “lift the curtain” on the reading process that goes into the Truman FSC, letting everyone see what it looks like when the FSC meets, what the committee’s procedures are, and how Truman goes about winnowing the approximately 600 applications to name about 200 finalists, and 2) to share what I learn about the Truman Scholarship from the perspective of a scholarship advisor that will help me advise my own candidates in the future.

What I won’t be doing, obviously, is discussing anything specific about candidates, or giving away details that could be tied to any one applicant. I’ll stick to generalities about how the process is going and what I am learning in the big picture.

Go ahead – take a peak behind the curtain!

Read more at Reading Harry.

The post Lifting the Curtain on the Truman Finalist Selection Process appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Why YOU Should Host a Finalist Dinner https://trumanscholars.org/for-scholars/why-you-should-host-a-finalist-dinner/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=why-you-should-host-a-finalist-dinner Mon, 24 Jan 2011 03:20:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/01/23/why-you-should-host-a-finalist-dinner Posted in For Scholars

By Jane Rock Costanza (WY ’91) “It’s that time of year again!  In just a few months, Truman finalists will be gathering around the United States for their Regional Review Panels.  As has become tradition, The Truman Scholars Association (TSA) is organizing a series of Truman Scholar Finalist Dinners in each city, the night before […]

The post Why YOU Should Host a Finalist Dinner appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>

By Jane Rock Costanza (WY ’91)

“It’s that time of year again! 
In just a few months, Truman finalists will be gathering around the
United States for their Regional Review Panels. 
As has become tradition, The Truman Scholars Association (TSA) is
organizing a series of Truman Scholar Finalist Dinners in each city, the night
before the Panel.  Finalist Dinners
provide an outlet for current Scholars to meet potential Truman Scholars and
answer questions about the Truman Scholarship program.”
 – TSA
Board of Directors

The above is the prelude to a call for current Scholars to
volunteer as hosts for one of the many finalist dinners and/or meet and greets
that will begin in March throughout the country.

As the host of the Denver area finalist dinner last year, I
encourage fellow Scholars to step up and volunteer to host this year. TSA
provides all the information necessary to make the job of host run smoothly.
The benefit of this is that the hosts are able to concentrate on the fun part
of the job.

Finding a local venue is part of that fun. It offers the
chance to really reflect upon your city and to see it through the eyes of
visitors. Once the venue is locked in, a great time is to be had in connecting
with area Scholars as well as tracking down a few “lost” Scholars in
the region.

Because of the unique rapport among Scholars, the pre-dinner
ice breaker in Denver last year with Executive Secretary Fred Slabach (MS ’77) and
area Scholars felt like old home week. Mr. Slabach gave a brief presentation on
the current status of the Foundation, and then area Scholars were able to get
acquainted (translate: swap war stories about our own interviews, catch up with
each other on our post-university lives, and exchange information for future
networking). 

The opportunity to share our own experiences, answer
questions and to mentor the new finalists was heartwarming to say the least. To
see the new group of potential Truman Scholars and outstanding individuals walk
in, size each other up as adversaries, and then to watch them walk out together
as friends and colleagues, was priceless.

Hosting a finalist dinner is such a small way to give back
to the Foundation that has given each of us so very much. I encourage you to
volunteer. For more information or to sign up, visit http://www.trumanscholars.org/events/spring2011.

Jane Rock Costanza (WY
’91) recently retired from the State of Colorado School for the Deaf and the
Blind where she was a member of the counseling, diagnostic and outreach teams
specializing in at risk youth, program development, state wide consulting, and
working with students with multiple disabilities. Her newest venture will begin
in March, volunteering with cyclists who have sustained traumatic brain
injuries and those with other adaptive needs.

 

Denver2

 

Denver

The post Why YOU Should Host a Finalist Dinner appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
A Look Back at the 2009 National Conference https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/a-look-back-at-the-2009-national-conference/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=a-look-back-at-the-2009-national-conference Tue, 13 Jul 2010 04:05:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2010/07/13/a-look-back-at-the-2009-national-conference Posted in For ScholarsFrom TSA

More than one year has passed since the inaugural Truman Scholars National Conference was held June 19-21, 2009 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This was the largest gathering of Truman Scholars to date, with more than 300 Scholars present. For an agenda and more information about the National Conference, please visit http://www.trumanscholars.org/national-conference.  […]

The post A Look Back at the 2009 National Conference appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
More than one year has passed since the inaugural Truman Scholars National Conference was held June 19-21, 2009 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This was the largest gathering of Truman Scholars to date, with more than 300 Scholars present. For an agenda and more information about the National Conference, please visit http://www.trumanscholars.org/national-conference

Following the National Conference, a PDF newsletter [click here to download the PDF] was distributed via the Truman Scholars listserve. We have re-posted the articles online and hope you enjoy reading them and re-experiencing this landmark event. 

 
 

The post A Look Back at the 2009 National Conference appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Harry and Health Care https://trumanscholars.org/for-scholars/harry-and-health-care/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=harry-and-health-care Tue, 13 Apr 2010 14:45:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2010/04/13/harry-and-health-care Posted in For Scholars

Contributed by Wendy R. Leibowitz “I have had some bitter disappointments as president, but the one that has troubled me most, in a personal way, has been the failure to defeat organized opposition to a national compulsory health insurance program.” -Letter, cited in Poen, Monte M.: Strictly Personal and Confidential: The Letters Harry Truman Never […]

The post Harry and Health Care appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Contributed by Wendy R. Leibowitz


“I have had some bitter
disappointments as president, but the one that has troubled me most, in a
personal way, has been the failure to defeat organized opposition to a national
compulsory health insurance program.”

-Letter, cited in Poen, Monte M.: Strictly Personal and Confidential: The
Letters Harry Truman Never Mailed,
Boston: Little Brown, ed. 1982. See
also:  http://www.thealliancefordemocracy.org/pdf/AfDJR3314.pdf

 

Following the health care reform
debate of 2009 was difficult enough, but one thing made it harder for some
Truman Scholars: the failure of many media outlets to mention Harry S. Truman
as the first president to champion national obligatory health insurance
coverage. Many publications and electronic services mentioned Clinton’s failed
attempt, but the references to “HillaryCare” far outnumbered references to
“HarryCare.”  (OK, that term did not
exist when Truman held office. But shouldn’t it have been invoked in 2009?)
Truman’s efforts, over many years, to obtain national compulsory health
insurance were strikingly more similar to the current administration’s efforts
than more modern efforts had been.

Within
a year of taking office, Truman called
for compulsory health insurance for all, funded by payroll deductions. All
citizens would receive medical and hospital services regardless of ability to
pay. The plan went nowhere. Actually, it went nowhere twice—reform efforts
failed in both his first term (1945-1949) and his second term (1949-1953).

The first time he proposed it, Truman simply did not
have the stature or the personal influence over Congress to bring such a change
about.  He had been vice president for
only 82 days when President Franklin Roosevelt died. Truman’s image was of
someone who had become president by a “wild accident,” in the words of a
newspaper columnist of the day, Max Lerner. David McCullough, in his
best-selling biography, Truman,
explains that Truman’s plain-speaking style—a stark contrast to FDR’s more
elegant speech—did not help polish Truman’s image as a powerful statesman who
could steer the ship of state well, let alone into the unknown waters of universal
health insurance. Truman himself stated to the press corps, shortly after
taking the oath of office: “Boys, if you ever pray, pray for me now. I don’t
know if you fellas ever had a load of hay fall on you, but when they told me
what happened yesterday, I felt like the moon, the stars, and all the planets
had fallen on me.” After Truman left office, his honesty came to be
admired, but at the outset of his presidency, the “I’m just a man from
Missouri” talk did not increase people’s confidence in his abilities.

Truman’s
relations with Congress were rocky, and his poll numbers low. Still, in
November 1945, Truman
called for the creation of a national health insurance fund to be run by the
federal government. The fund would be optional and open to all. Participants
would pay monthly fees into the plan, which would cover the cost of any and all
medical expenses. The government would pay for the cost of services rendered by
any doctor who chose to join the program. Truman argued that the federal
government should play a role in health care, saying that, “The health of
American children, like their education, should be recognized as a definite
public responsibility.”

For the first time in our country’s
history, Congress had before it an official administration proposal for a
general program of national health insurance: the Wagner-Murray-Dingell bill. Truman
called national health insurance a cornerstone of “The Fair Deal.” The idea in
general was popular: a poll published in Forbes
magazine showed 74 percent of the public favoring such a plan, and a Gallup
poll showed 59 percent favored some kind of broad national program of health
insurance.

But the plan couldn’t even get a
hearing before the House Ways and Means Committee. The hearings in the Senate
were bitter and divisive in ways that might sound familiar today. The acrimony
did not help further a civil discussion of the issues. In the 1946
congressional elections, the New Deal-Fair Deal programs were a major campaign
focus. The Republicans won their first majority in Congress since 1932 using
the slogan, “Had Enough?”

Subsequent years solidified the
opposition to government health insurance. Organized labor turned to employers
to provide health care for their employees. The American Medical Association
asserted some of the same arguments that helped kill “HillaryCare”: the United
States already had the highest standards of medical care in the world. While
there were some problems, great progress was being made at addressing them
within the free enterprise system. Second, government control of medical care
would undermine the existing system (which was the best system in the world,
etc.)  Additionally, universal health
insurance would be so expensive that it might bankrupt a country that needed to
rebuild Europe after the war, fight Communism abroad and at home, and
strengthen the free enterprise system. Finally, the AMA felt it was
unnecessary: private insurance was capable of doing the job. The doctors’
organization distributed millions of pamphlets and won endorsements from almost
2,000 organizations, from the American Bar Association and the American Dental
Association through the Catholic Church and the General Federation of Women’s
Clubs. Support for national health insurance evaporated.
Even after Truman won a stunning electoral victory in 1948, with national
health care as a new plank in the Democratic platform, the plan could not make
it out of committee. His “Whistle Stop Tour” of the country—9,505 miles, through 18 states, delivering 73
speeches—helped to restore a (small) Democratic majority in Congress. But
other concerns, from ant-Communism to the newly shaky economy to the Korean
War, took precedence. By the election of 1950, a conservative postwar Congress married
health insurance to patriotism. Opposition to the private insurance system was
portrayed as un-American and “revolutionary,” particularly by the
American Medical Association.

On July 30,
1965, President Lyndon Johnson traveled to Independence, Missouri, to sign the
new Medicare bill at the Truman Library so a frail Truman could be in
attendance. According to McCullough’s biography, Truman sat with a cane in his
lap as Johnson signed the law for health insurance for the elderly that Truman
had championed (for all) two decades ago. 
McCullough writes that Truman said, “You have made me a very, very happy
man.”

Wendy R. Leibowitz (DC ’80) is a lawyer and writer in Washington, DC.

If you would like to conduct an interview
or write a feature for the Truman Scholars Blog, please contact
 TSA@trumanscholars.org.

The post Harry and Health Care appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Foundation Requests Stevens Award Nominations, Applications https://trumanscholars.org/for-scholars/foundation-requests-stevens-award-nominations-applications/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=foundation-requests-stevens-award-nominations-applications Fri, 08 Jan 2010 21:45:33 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2010/01/08/foundation-requests-stevens-award-nominations-applications Posted in For Scholars

  The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation requests nominations and applications for the 2010 Stevens Award.   The Stevens Award was established in 1999 by the Board of Trustees of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation in honor of the late U.S. District Court Judge, Joseph E. Stevens, Jr.  Judge Stevens was from Kansas City […]

The post Foundation Requests Stevens Award Nominations, Applications appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
 

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation requests nominations and applications for the 2010 Stevens Award.

 

The Stevens Award was established in 1999 by the Board of Trustees of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation in honor of the late U.S. District Court Judge, Joseph E. Stevens, Jr.  Judge Stevens was from Kansas City and was the former Chairman of the Foundation Board of Trustees.

 

The Stevens Award is granted annually to a Truman Scholar attorney who has made significant contributions in the public sector and who has provided extraordinary service to the Foundation.  The Stevens Award is presented in a ceremony at U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. in June.

 

Nominations and applications should include a brief biographical sketch of the candidate and a letter outlining the candidate’s contributions to the public sector and to the Foundation.

 

All nominations and applications for the Staats Award should be forwarded to Executive Secretary Slabach at fslabach@truman.gov by February 15, 2010.

 

The post Foundation Requests Stevens Award Nominations, Applications appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Foundation Requests Senior Scholar Nominations, Applications https://trumanscholars.org/for-scholars/foundation-requests-senior-scholar-nominations-applications/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=foundation-requests-senior-scholar-nominations-applications Fri, 08 Jan 2010 21:45:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2010/01/08/foundation-requests-senior-scholar-nominations-applications Posted in For Scholars

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation requests nominations and applications for positions as Senior Scholars at TSLW 2010.   Senior Scholars are required to attend the entire Truman Scholars Leadership Week (May 24 through May 30, 2010) and make themselves available to the new Trumans in both formal and informal capacities.  Senior Scholars serve as […]

The post Foundation Requests Senior Scholar Nominations, Applications appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation requests nominations and applications for positions as Senior Scholars at TSLW 2010.

 

Senior Scholars are required to attend the entire Truman Scholars Leadership Week (May 24 through May 30, 2010) and make themselves available to the new Trumans in both formal and informal capacities.  Senior Scholars serve as role models for the recently selected Scholars and introduce them to new and different ways of service. Senior Scholars conduct presentations on a variety of topics during TSLW – both personal and professional. Senior Scholars work with a small group of new Trumans on a policy topic with which the Senior Scholar has some expertise, and help the Scholars to understand the complexities of issues and the contributions all political ideologies can offer to the search for solutions.

 

Senior Scholars should have completed a graduate school program at least one year prior to TSLW (exceptions may be made for students currently in medical residency or finishing PhD programs). Seniors should currently be working in public service and be able to commit to the entire week.  Senior Scholars can come from any discipline – as the best cohort is one that has a mix of disciplines represented.

 

Nominations and applications should detail the candidate’s educational, professional and personal experiences that the candidate feels would be appropriate to share with the Scholars. These materials also should explain why the candidate would be a good Senior Scholar and whether the candidate has any prior experience in either a teaching or counseling environment.

 

Please email this information to Fred Slabach (fslabach@truman.gov) no later than February 15, 2010. We will consider nominations and applications as they arrive.

 

 

 

 

The post Foundation Requests Senior Scholar Nominations, Applications appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
Foundation Requests Staats Award Nominations, Applications https://trumanscholars.org/for-scholars/foundation-requests-staats-award-nominations-applications/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=foundation-requests-staats-award-nominations-applications Fri, 08 Jan 2010 21:43:41 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2010/01/08/foundation-requests-staats-award-nominations-applications Posted in For Scholars

The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation requests nominations and application for the Elmer Staats Award.   The Staats Award was established in 1993 by the Board of Trustees of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation in honor of Elmer Staats, the former Comptroller of the Currency and Chairman of the Truman Board of Trustees. The […]

The post Foundation Requests Staats Award Nominations, Applications appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>
The Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation requests nominations and application for the Elmer Staats Award.

 

The Staats Award was established in 1993 by the Board of Trustees of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation in honor of Elmer Staats, the former Comptroller of the Currency and Chairman of the Truman Board of Trustees. The Staats Award is granted annually to a Truman Scholar who has made significant contributions in the public sector and who has provided extraordinary service to the Foundation.

 

The Award is presented at TSLW in Liberty, Missouri at the end of May.  Nominations and applications should include a brief biographical sketch of the candidate and a letter outlining the candidate’s contributions to the public sector and to the Foundation.

 

All nominations and applications for the Staats Award should be forwarded to Executive Secretary Slabach at fslabach@truman.gov by February 15, 2010.

The post Foundation Requests Staats Award Nominations, Applications appeared first on Truman Scholars Association.

]]>