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From TSA – Truman Scholars Association https://trumanscholars.org Tue, 29 Jul 2014 03:29:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://trumanscholars.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/truman_logo_gsuite-100x100.gif From TSA – Truman Scholars Association https://trumanscholars.org 32 32 Dena Simmons, 2004 https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/dena-simmons-2004/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=dena-simmons-2004 Thu, 08 May 2014 00:23:27 +0000 http://trumanscholars.org/?p=1884 Posted in From TSAGeneral InfoProfile

Dena Simmons (CT ’04) If I were to ask you to list the top five individuals in your life who have influenced you the most, I’m certain that a large percentage of you would name at least one teacher.  And I bet you’d have a ready example of why that is so.  I think it’s […]

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SimmonsHeadshot2014Dena Simmons (CT ’04)

If I were to ask you to list the top five individuals in your life who have influenced you the most, I’m certain that a large percentage of you would name at least one teacher.  And I bet you’d have a ready example of why that is so.  I think it’s also a safe wager to suppose that the ones making your lists went above
and beyond the basics.  They were, most likely, people who were fiercely dedicated to giving as much as humanly possible in order to increase your chances at success.  Maybe, like me, you find it a bit confounding to come up with a word that adequately describes how far reaching their impact has been on you.  We call them teachers, I guess, because that’s the widely accepted appellation.  It has always struck me as a term falling colossally short, though. Especially in capturing the essence of the ones who stand out.  The ones we remember vividly across our lifespan.  The ones whose words of encouragement, acts of kindness, enduring patience, piercing insight, tireless imaginations, and indelible role modeling help shape our character and drive us to believe in the fullness of our potential.

I don’t know if I’ll ever come up with a word that fits the “rockstars” of the profession.  But I can give you a name synonymous with the one percent of the best of the best. The name of a woman who continues to raise the bar higher still, and who is a unique gift to every student ever fortunate enough to sit in her classroom, or somehow sneak an opportunity at some point in their lives to cross her path.

Her name is Dena Simmons.

Among many accolades to her credit, Dena was recently selected as a MAKER: Women Who Make America, which is an ongoing initiative aiming to be the largest collection of women’s stories ever assembled.  MAKERS.com is a dynamic digital platform, developed by AOL and PBS that showcases compelling stories of female trailblazers, including our very own Madeleine Albright, President of the Board of Trustees.  You can see Dena’s powerful interview here.

Having just completed her dissertation, Dena will be graduating with her EdD in Health Education from Columbia University, Teachers College in May 2014. She is a graduate of Middlebury College, and she has an MA in Health Education from Teachers College and a MSEd in Childhood Education from Pace University.  She is also a Certified Health Education Specialist.

Her list of credentials is extremely impressive and hard earned.  It is, however, Dena’s passion that defines her.

 This is her story as only she can tell it:

For as long as I could remember, I have always wanted to be an educator. My mother’s dedication and hard work to provide my two sisters and me with a good education instilled in me the importance of education.  I grew up on Creston Avenue and 183rd Street, a drug-infested, violent neighborhood in the Bronx. Nothing about my dilapidated surroundings sent me the message that I mattered.  Yet, my mother’s struggling to send my sisters and me to the neighborhood parochial school sent us the message that we mattered. After eighth grade, my sisters and I were fortunate to receive full scholarships to boarding schools and colleges in New England. Over the years, I have seen how education has opened up doors to more opportunities and to a better life. Education has empowered my family and me, and because of that, I knew I wanted to dedicate my life to empowering others, especially those in marginalized communities like the one in which I was raised. I want to provide others with access to knowledge and to resources that could improve their lives and allow them to experience their visions of success. Being an educator allows me to work from the heart, and that type of work is the work that wakes me up each morning.

Because I learned early the importance of good schooling, I am dedicated to providing others with what my mother provided to me—a better life through education.  My dedication to educating others led me to New York City’s Office of the Mayor as an education policy intern.  One of my projects was to research the teen mother population by analyzing pregnancy prevention programs, data related to the health, education, and economic status of pregnant and parenting teens, and the schools that serve them.  I spoke to experts and practitioners in the field, built a case for improved focus on the population’s needs, and provided recommendations for next steps to City Hall officials.

My internship exposed me to the public health problem of teenage pregnancy and informed my policy proposal for my application to the Harry S. Truman Scholarship, an award I was granted.  Dedicated to implementing my policy proposal, I pursued research in the Dominican Republic with a Fulbright grant to learn how schools and health agencies collaborate to engage vulnerable youth and to prevent unwanted teenage pregnancy.  While in Santo Domingo, I interviewed teen mothers and assisted medical personnel at a government maternity hospital.  I observed effective and ineffective health education programs at educational institutions and completed projects for nongovernmental organizations.

My Fulbright research and work with nongovernmental organizations exposed me to the lack of access youth have to healthcare and to information about their sexual and reproductive health, the discrimination and injustice pregnant and parenting teens face in schools and in society, the cycle of poverty teenage pregnancy perpetuates, and the absence of programs to empower young men.  The blatant disregard for Dominican youth strengthened my commitment to empower young people through the education and public health sectors.

My commitment led me to teach in a public middle school in the South Bronx, where I guided my students to high levels of social and academic achievement. Committed to my students’ success, I taught for three years in a row until they graduated. I brought the world to my students. For example, I invited outside organizations to bring social justice, music, arts, and athletic programming to my students, especially considering the depletion of such programming in our schools because of the current culture of test-based accountability.  For example, when teaching in the South Bronx, I asked Americorps volunteers at Bronx Lebanon Hospital to teach my students lessons on nutrition, substance and alcohol abuse, safe sex practices and sexuality, and other health education topics.  Since my school did not have a health education program, I used a community asset to fill a gap in my students’ education.  To bring dance instruction to my class, I invited Columbia University students to teach my students West African dance while we learned about the African slave trade and the history of African Americans through reading Walter Dean Myers’ Now Is Your Time!: The African American Struggle for Freedom.

Additionally, I connected with outside social justice groups and took advantage of my circle of friends during some of my social justice lessons.  During a unit on worker’s rights, for instance, I invited two representatives from the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to speak to my students about their experience working on farms as well as the need for fair wages. I wanted to not only expose my students to the many inequalities in the health and education systems, but also to equip them with necessary knowledge to recognize injustice when they see it so that they can combat it.

By connecting with the community and other outside resources, I transformed what education was “supposed” to look like for the Brown and Black children in the South Bronx by bringing the world to my students, by making their education about what they wanted to learn, not by what politicians with little to no education background thought looked good in headlines.  Essentially, building relationships with students, their families, community members, and other social justice groups is key.

In the summer after my first year of teaching, I went to Antigua, my mother’s native island, and worked with the Directorate of Gender Affairs as a volunteer consultant to help Dominican sex workers find educational and health resources to improve the quality of their lives.  The Dominican women I met had such interesting lives and stories that amplified how poverty often impacts the decisions one makes.  I was able to speak with practitioners in the field as well. Overall, I gained a better understanding of the experience of being undocumented and, as a result, having limited support and resources.  I left more certain that dedicating my life to empowering others and to fighting against social injustice was what I was destined to do.

While I loved teaching, the classroom felt limiting. Working within a broken system set up to fail some students and not others frustrated me. On top of that, teacher voices are often excluded when making education policy. That said, despite being intimidated by graduate school, it offered me an opportunity not only to learn how to be an effective public servant on a larger scale, but also to become a visible, respected, and included voice in education policy.  Particularly, I wanted to learn how to ensure that students (and teachers) had safe, secure learning environments.

As an educator, I make it my mission to create a safe classroom environment for my students. However, while commendable, my actions are unsustainable and only benefit my small group of students. My desire to ensure that all students are safe, not just the ones in my classroom, to learn inspires my research interests in preventing and reducing bullying and violent behaviors in schools. Specifically, my research focuses on teacher preparedness to identify, to prevent, and to respond to bullying situations in the middle school setting. By understanding teachers’ needs with regard to violence and bullying prevention at schools, the hope is that policymakers, researchers, and schools of education can better equip and support teachers to prevent aggressive behaviors and to create and foster safe and supportive learning communities.

My work and research experiences have been unified by the theme of empowering others and confronting and interrupting multiple forms of violence and injustice. This is the work that calls me—always has and always will.

TEDx talk: What to do if a student comes at you with scissors?

TEDx talk: It’s 10PM. Do you know where your children are?

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Know Your Scholars: Wendi Adelson 2000 Florida https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/wendi-adelson/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wendi-adelson Mon, 07 Apr 2014 01:15:28 +0000 http://trumanscholars.org/?p=1866 Posted in From TSAGeneral InfoProfile

  “Human Trafficking” is a term most of us are familiar with.  Yet, the realities of its meaning are held at a safe distance – like a tenable mystery we’re not all that eager to explore with our magnifying glass.  Even those who consider themselves well read and up to speed on current events would […]

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 wendi

“Human Trafficking” is a term most of us are familiar with.  Yet, the realities of its meaning are held at a safe distance – like a tenable mystery we’re not all that eager to explore with our magnifying glass.  Even those who consider themselves well read and up to speed on current events would probably be astounded by what they don’t know that they don’t know about this criminal underworld.  Wendi’s insightfully gritty novel, This Is Our Story, changes that for every reader who dares to enter that world through the gut wrenching experiences of Rosa and Mila, the compelling voices that draw us in and leave us unwilling to remain uninformed and uninvolved.  Wendi’s signature writing style, healthy sense of humor, and thought provokingly intimate presentation of Rosa and Mila’s stories is exactly the mastery needed to lead the reader through the pages with grace and strength, and at the perfect tempo.  The women’s immigration attorney, Lily, has her own story as well which adds invaluable texture and multi-faceted dimension to the indelible imprint of this book on the social justice consciousness of anyone who reads it.

Wendi’s book has just been selected by Florida State University as featured reading provided to thousands of incoming freshman this year, and Wendi has been asked to speak at the New Student Convocation Ceremony on August 24, 2014.

A Clinical Professor and the Director of the Medical Legal Partnership at FSU’s College of Law, Wendi, who is a native Floridian, had this to say about what informed her decision to become a lawyer and how she arrived at Florida State University:

 In college I was looking for any way to learn Spanish so that I could connect with more people.  I got a fellowship to work with families of the disappeared post Dirty War in Argentina.  During that work in Buenos Aires in the summer of 1999 I met Adolfo Perez Esquivel, who is a Noble Peace Prize Winner.  I started spending two days a week with him at his camp for kids.  I would wake up at 5:30 in the morning and wait for him for a while on a cold subway platform.  When he arrived, we would drive for two hours each way out to the “campo” to connect with 15 or so kids, teach them computers and life lessons, and then head back to the city.  During that time with Adolfo I was so impressed with the way that he worked with individual people, but also spent time traveling around the world giving talks on the movement against violence.  I realized then that I wanted to develop a skillset that I could use to help individual people, but also to advance larger policies.  I thought law was a good tool for social change to use in that regard.

 I screwed up fantastically and ended up with a dream job as a clinical law professor.  I fell in love with the wrong man, and he got a job in Tallahassee.  I had wanted to be in DC or become a foreign service officer, or in the previous few years, live closely to my family in South Florida.  So, ill-fated romance took me to Tallahassee, and love for my children keeps me here.

My children are 3 and 4, fourteen months apart.  Much of the last 4 years has been a giant blur.  They are my heart walking around outside of my body, and every decision related to my career has been made with them in mind.  I was offered my dream job of directing an immigration clinic in another city when I was 7 months pregnant with my older son, and I turned it down, because I didn’t know what his needs would be when he was born, or how being a mother would change my perspective on work and family.  And now, I’ve received offers for more lucrative employment, but not with the same kind of flexibility, and so I turn them down as well, because what matters most to me, today, is that I can spend the most amount of quality time with my lovies.

 I asked Wendi to explain a little about the Medical Legal Partnership:

The medical legal partnership is a clinical legal program, which means that we use experiential learning (we partner with a local community health clinic and represent homeless, indigent, undocumented, and physically/mentally ill persons with their petitions for disability and immigration legal services) to teach law students how to practice law.  Students do every aspect of a case, from performing intake, doing research, and filing applications/petitions, and advocating for a client in administrative court.  This past week we advocated with various senators/representatives for medicaid expansion in Florida.  We brought one of our clients who falls within the coverage gap to show the senators/representatives who voted against expansion the human face that loses when they make political choices.

 I also run an alternative spring break program where law and medical students provide legal assistance to migrant farm workers and their families, and learn about the impact of farmwork on individual and family health, and how the law can impact other social determinants of health.  This time, our students went to one of the parking lots where workers congregate for work at 5:30AM, and we talked with a crewleader about her life and her work as a young migrant farmworker and as an adult crewleader.

Medical-Legal Partnership Alternative Spring Break in Immokalee, Florida

Goals:
Introduce law students to the life of migrant farm workers through an immersion experience during Spring break. The goal is to help students understand the psychosocial realities and legal challenges that impact health in this population and help them acquire legal skills that will better equip them to work with this population.

Description:
Students spend a week providing legal assistance at the community health center with FSU College of Medicine and College of Law faculty, doing outreach legal assistance at health fairs with other agencies in Immokalee and learning about the migrant lifestyle through home visits, visits to the fields and packing houses and other agencies.

Wendi’s motivation to write This Is Our Story is best summarized in her own words, here:

As a clinical law professor, I sometimes feel like a reluctant academic.  The idea of being an academic inspires visions of the ivory tower, where conversations about the law take place amongst lofty people with powdered wigs (*I mean no offense to the British*). I am focused on real-world legal practice, largely around the issue of immigration. Thus, most often when someone asks me what I do for a living I respond, “public interest lawyer” or “immigration lawyer, but the good kind that doesn’t rip people off.’  It is important to me to describe what I do in terms of its relation to the clients we serve, the community at large, and the inherent opportunity to serve the public good. 

So, circa 2008, when I was working as an immigration attorney at the Florida State University Center for the Advancement of Human Rights (a lofty title for a building with a dilapidated staircase into the old house-turned organization and an office barely big enough to house the hot water heater that sat next to my desk) I discovered that there was an inconsistency in the laws that favored children who were victims of sex trafficking, but seemingly mischaracterized kids that had been prostituted as criminals.  I thought this was very interesting, and I still do, but as I sat down to write an article on the esoteric differences in these laws I discovered that what I most wanted to do was tell my client’s stories, and mine (*i.e. what it means to be a public interest lawyer*) to a broader audience. 

For the previous few years, I had represented abused immigrant women, immigrant children who fled violence and abuse at home, persecuted people seeking asylum, and victims of human trafficking.  Instead of writing an article for a legal publication primarily read by legal academics  and practitioners (*no offense meant to the legal scholars out there*), I wanted to write my clients’ stories. I wanted to give voice to a population that often has none.  I wanted people to know how criminals and traffickers exploit human vulnerabilities; what the experience of being trafficked is actually like; and the struggle to piece together broken lives when (and if) it ends. 

I wrote this novel, putting in hours each day for two years, finishing just before my first son was born.  I then spent the next two years trying to find an agent or a publisher to no avail (and gave birth to my second son during that time, while continuing to work).  Finally, in 2011, I decided to self-publish. The chance to public with an academic publisher came in 2012.  Now, in 2014, I am thrilled that my novel, This is Our Story, has been selected by Florida State University for their One Book, One Campus initiative.  Over the summer, 7,000 incoming freshman will engage with the issue of human trafficking by reading and discussing my book. This is both an honor and an opportunity to educate students on this deeply important issue.

I am hopeful that being exposed to my clients’ stories will make an impact on the Class of 2018. Maybe one of these freshpeople will pursue a career in mental health and provide services to trafficked persons recovering from trauma.  Perhaps some of the law students that I teach in Tallahassee, Florida will also represent victims of human trafficking. These possibilities make me less of a reluctant academic- because they represent the possibility that the modern university can fuel real-world social change.  Maybe one day, when my boys are no longer in diapers, they will bring me to school for career day, proud that their mom is a clinical law professor. 

 

 

 

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Scholars All-A-Twitter at Nat’l Conference https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/scholars-all-a-twitter-at-natl-conference/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=scholars-all-a-twitter-at-natl-conference Wed, 20 Jul 2011 00:41:31 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/07/19/scholars-all-a-twitter-at-natl-conference Posted in From TSA

Those of you attending the conference in person and those who want to follow it from afar can join the conversation using the Truman Conference Twitter App, located at www.trumanconference.org/app. The App, which is accessible from your computer or mobile device, feeds in all tweets using hashtag #TrumanScholars, as well as official announcements from the […]

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TrumanApp

Those of
you attending the conference in person and those who want to follow it from
afar can join the conversation using the Truman Conference Twitter App, located
at www.trumanconference.org/app.
The App, which is accessible from your computer or mobile device, feeds in all
tweets using hashtag #TrumanScholars, as well as official announcements from
the Truman Scholars Association and what’s next on the conference schedule. You
don’t have to be on Twitter to see what’s going on, just go to www.trumanconference.org/app.  To participate, simply join Twitter and join
the conversation using #TrumansScholars. 
Attendees, starting tomorrow evening we’ll be sending official
announcements out on this app, not by email, so check it out!

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Albright to Speak at National Conference https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/albright-to-speak-at-national-conference/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=albright-to-speak-at-national-conference Thu, 23 Jun 2011 03:04:50 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/06/22/albright-to-speak-at-national-conference Posted in From TSA

Dear Scholars, I am pleased to report that the President of the Truman Foundation, the Honorable Madeleine Albright, has accepted our invitation to speak at the conference on Saturday morning July 23! Dr. Albright was the first woman named as Secretary of State in 1997–and at that time the highest ranking woman in US government. She will speak during the […]

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Albright

Dear Scholars,

I am pleased to report that the President of the
Truman Foundation, the Honorable Madeleine Albright, has accepted our
invitation to speak at the conference on Saturday morning July 23!

Dr.
Albright was the first woman named as Secretary of State in
1997–and at that time the highest ranking woman in US government. She will speak during the plenary session,
and afterward she has offered a Q and A session with the audience.

Within the next few days I will be updating the
conference agenda online to reflect this exciting news as well as
some other, smaller changes.

I encourage you to visit www.trumanconference.org
and register TODAY! Don’t forget to book your room at the OmniShoreham Hotel.

Jessica Sotelo
Conference Director

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Conference Registration Live! https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/conference-registration-live/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=conference-registration-live Tue, 03 May 2011 01:16:17 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/05/02/conference-registration-live Posted in From TSA

By Jessica Sotelo (ID ’00) We are now less than three months away from our 2011 National Conference and I hope you are as excited as I am! If you haven’t heard, registration is now open. Please visit www.trumanconference.org and register now in order to get the “Early Bird” rate! The registration is a 2 […]

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Sotelo.jpg

By Jessica Sotelo (ID ’00)

We are now less than three months away from our 2011 National Conference and I hope you are as excited as I am!

If you haven’t heard, registration is now open. Please visit www.trumanconference.org and register now in order to get the “Early Bird” rate! The registration is a 2 step process so once you have input your information, you will need to click on the payment (Step 2) option and input your payment information.

I have a quick update about the White House Tour we are requesting for Friday, July 22. Our very own Kyle Gracey will be leading the tour! Kyle has experience with White House tours and its always nice to get “inside information” from someone who has worked there. As of right now we have over 35 people signed up for the tour!

Just a reminder that our confirmed keynote speakers include U.S. Senator Chris Coons (DE ’83) and Ambassador Michelle Gavin (AZ ’85), both Truman Scholars, as well as Clifton Truman Daniel, author and grandson of President Truman.

For more details about the agenda and speakers visit www.trumanconference.org and register now!

Jessica Sotelo (ID ’00), executive director of Partners for Prosperity, is the 2011 National Conference Director.

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Nat’l Conference Committee Calls for Breakout Session Applications https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/natl-conference-committee-calls-for-breakout-session-applications/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=natl-conference-committee-calls-for-breakout-session-applications Wed, 06 Apr 2011 02:29:49 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/04/05/natl-conference-committee-calls-for-breakout-session-applications Posted in From TSA

The 2011 TSA national conference is fast approaching, and the TSA board has been working hard to put together an event that will be fun and inspiring.  We received great feedback to the survey that was sent out last fall, and thus would like to seek your input again by asking for proposals for breakout sessions […]

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The 2011 TSA national conference is fast approaching, and the TSA board has been working hard to put together an event that will be fun and inspiring.  We received great feedback to the survey that was sent out last fall, and thus would like to seek your input again by asking for proposals for breakout sessions for the 2011 conference.

Each “breakout session” will have multiple panels and workshops addressing a variety of topics, and scholars can choose which to attend based on their individual interests.  Panels will feature a moderator-led discussion among a number of expert panelists, and will seek to educate scholars and foster discussion on that panel’s particular topic.  The workshops will also be led by experts from the field, but will be more interactive than the panels and will focus on developing a particular skill set. We are looking for proposals that highlight innovative research and public service representative of a broad field, and are particularly interested in seeing what scholars have accomplished in the years since being awarded the scholarship and graduating from school.

Proposals should be emailed to Michele Buckley (buckleymb@gmail.com) by April 15.  Please include as much of the following information as possible:

  1. Name, scholar year and state, and title
  2. Educational background
  3. Title of breakout session
  4. Brief summary of presentation
  5. Who will be presenting? (We welcome both scholars and non-scholars to make presentations!)
  6. What are the professional qualifications/education background of the presenters?
  7. What are the key things you want to share in this presentation?
  8. What are the “takeaways” from this presentation (new skills, information, methods, etc.)?
  9. Any additional information 

Thank you for your help and we look forward to seeing you in July!

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Sotelo: National Conference Fast Approaching https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/sotelo-national-conference-fast-approaching/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=sotelo-national-conference-fast-approaching Sun, 03 Apr 2011 03:18:48 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/04/02/sotelo-national-conference-fast-approaching Posted in From TSA

Hello from 2011 Conference Central! The countdown to the conference has begun and we are less than four months away from the “don’t miss” Truman event of the year. The TSA Board and particularly the events committee is moving into high planning mode as we finalize details for the July 22-24 event at the OMNI […]

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Hello from 2011 Conference Central!

The countdown to the conference has begun and we are less than four months away from the “don’t miss” Truman event of the year. The TSA Board and particularly the events committee is moving into high planning mode as we finalize details for the July 22-24 event at the OMNI Hotel in Washington DC.

First, we have lined up two of your fellow scholars who have recently reached major milestones in their public careers. First, Senator Chris Coons (DE ’83) will be our guest of honor on Friday, July 22 for a Gala Banquet. Second, Michelle Gavin (AZ ’95), the newly appointed “Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Republic of Botswana” will be our guest on Saturday at lunch. We are very fortunate to have two public servants at such a high level agree to speak at our conference.

We are also working on bringing you informative and timely plenary sessions with speakers and topics that will appeal to the broad range of scholars. More information on the plenaries (general sessions) will be announced as it becomes finalized.

Recently the events committee formed a subcommittee to look at breakout sessions and develop a plan to have a good mix of both panels, speakers and workshops for the breakouts. We heard your feedback from the last conference and wanted to structure the breakouts a little differently this time. Thank you to everyone who submitted ideas and proposals. I’m sure the subcommittee will send out an announcement soon.

We have so many surprises and things we are working on. Recently Matt Garza (CA ’09) created a map of “Truman Locations” for you to visit while you are in DC! Thank you Matt! We are also planning to request a White House Tour so very shortly we will announce registration is open and if you are interested please provide the security information requested.

If you or your organization is interested in being a sponsor, please email me or call me as soon as possible. Last conference we were able to keep registration costs down because of donors and a sponsor. Likewise, if you would like to make a donation to help offset costs and lower registration costs for everyone, please let me know.

Finally, I want to assure anyone with a dietary restriction such as: vegans, vegetarians, gluten free, kosher and others that the OMNI is prepared to have special meals during the conference! We appreciate everything the OMNI is doing to make the conference special. For those who do not have dietary restrictions, I can tell you that the dinner Friday night will be delicious. Recently Adair Boroughs (SC ’01), Anthony Shop (MO ’04), Kimberly Jones (CT ’99) and I all had the opportunity to participate in a tasting at the OMNI. I don’t think you will be disappointed with the food!

Watch your email and other Truman information sources for announcements in the coming weeks about registration and other details. As always, please contact me if you have questions.

A big thank you to the events committee for all their hard work: Chiraag Bains (MA ’02), Michele Buckley (CO ’06), Sarah Sattelmeyer (GA ’04), Dara Purvis (CA ’02), Katie Liberman (MA ’06), Lyric Chen (WI ’05), Matt and Adair. I takes many people to organize an event of this size–and in this case its being organized by Scholars volunteering their time to create an event that we will all remember.

Jessica Sotelo (ID’ 00), Executive Director at Partners for Prosperity, is the 2011 Truman Scholars National Conference Director.

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Truman Sightseeing in DC https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/truman-sightseeing-in-dc/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=truman-sightseeing-in-dc Sat, 02 Apr 2011 22:30:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/04/02/truman-sightseeing-in-dc Posted in From TSA

by Matthew Garza (CA ’09) There are countless maps and tourist guides for Washington, DC, a hodgepodge of monument circuits and invitations to ride a double decker bus. But as we prepare for the 2011 National Conference, we thought it fitting that the Scholar community have its own handbook for this historic city. Our namesake […]

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sightseeing

by Matthew Garza (CA ’09)

There are countless maps and tourist guides for Washington, DC, a hodgepodge of monument circuits and invitations to ride a double decker bus. But as we prepare for the 2011 National Conference, we thought it fitting that the Scholar community have its own handbook for this historic city. Our namesake president had a remarkable tenure here, and so today we are excited to announce the Truman Scholars’ Guide to Washington, DC. After consulting with history books and the Truman Library staff in Missouri, we have compiled a series of locations in the city where you can visit landmarks relevant to the 33rd president.

Some sites include:

  • Blair House – During the second term of the presidency of Harry Truman, the White House was found to have serious structural faults and was completely gutted and renovated. While the White House was undergoing renovation, the President resided at Blair House.
  • The Mayflower Renaissance Hotel – President Truman stayed here for the first 90 days of his presidency, and this is the location where he announced he would run for a second term.
  • The National Guard Armory Building – Truman’s inaugural ball occurred here.
  • The Omni-Shoreham Hotel (site of our conference) – To celebrate the inauguration of our 33rd President, The Democratic National Committee held a reception for Harry S. Truman here on January 21, 1949. 

If you get a chance to visit these sites, we would love to see some pictures we can share. So be sure to send those memories our way.

For the entire map, check out the Truman DC Sightseeing Map.

Matthew Garza (CA ’09) is a research assistant at the Brookings Institution.

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Lehman: Why I Made A Contribution to the TSA https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/lehman-why-i-made-a-contribution-to-the-tsa/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lehman-why-i-made-a-contribution-to-the-tsa Fri, 25 Feb 2011 21:36:28 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/02/25/lehman-why-i-made-a-contribution-to-the-tsa Posted in From TSA

by Adam Lehman (OH ’87)  Networks are not only shaping the new ways in which we socialize and consume media – but also in how we join forces and collaborate to generate social, political and economic change. One need look no further than the current wave of global revolutions to understand the power of networks […]

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by Adam Lehman (OH ’87) 

lehman

Networks are not only shaping the new ways in which we socialize and consume media – but also in how we join forces and collaborate to generate social, political and economic change. One need look no further than the current wave of global revolutions to understand the power of networks and the tools that support them. 

The Truman Scholars Association (TSA) represents a unique type of network. TSA members are current and emerging leaders across key public, private, academic and non-profit institutions; and leaders who share a commitment to public service and to solving the complex challenges we face in our public sphere. As members of the TSA, we hold enormous potential to find new ways to connect, collaborate and advance the mission of the Truman Scholars Association and public service worldwide. 

In that spirit, I was delighted to make a contribution to the TSA as it works to bring us together and nurture, engage and empower our community. Please join me by making a contribution to the TSA Annual Fund by visiting http://www.trumanscholars.org/giving.

Adam Lehman (OH ’87) currently serves as Chief Operating Officer at Lotame Solutions Inc. in Washington, DC.

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Update on Truman Scholar Association Initiatives https://trumanscholars.org/from-tsa/update-on-truman-scholar-association-initiatives/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=update-on-truman-scholar-association-initiatives Tue, 01 Feb 2011 16:45:00 +0000 http://www.trumanscholars.org/blog/2011/02/01/update-on-truman-scholar-association-initiatives Posted in From TSA

TSA continues to build the strategic plan it began to formulate during its inaugural in-person board meeting in October.  With the national conference date set, Robert Eisinger (NY ’85) and I are devising ways for the Truman Scholar community to help support our initiatives to provide scholars opportunities to gather, network, share best practices and […]

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Boroughs

TSA continues to build the strategic plan it began to formulate during its inaugural in-person board meeting in October.  With the national conference date set, Robert Eisinger (NY ’85) and I are devising ways for the Truman Scholar community to help support our initiatives to provide scholars opportunities to gather, network, share best practices and discover ways they can advance their public service aspirations.

I know Robert and I both believe the Truman Community has impacted our lives in monumental ways.  We have personally benefited from Truman Community’s tendency to inspire, its network of information, and the friendships it engenders.  As this community continues to grow, the Truman Scholars Association will be working to maximize these benefits for all Scholars, and Robert and I will be asking for your help in this endeavor.

Adair Ford Boroughs (SC ’01) is the President of the TSA Board of Directors.

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